Mangakuri, Pourerere, Aramoana

Catching up…

Today’s route marked in green…

We are travelling on a few unsealed roads today so we leave the caravan at Kairakau Beach where our neighbours Kevin and Jill are going to keep an eye on it for us.

We set off in the Triton and turn left into Mangakuri Road. This is an unsealed but shorter route to Pourerere from Kairakau.

This is our first time exploring these small coastal settlements in Central Hawkes Bay and I’m excited. John doesn’t get so excited about metal roads, but at least we’re not towing the caravan.

I keep wanting to quote that tv commercial, “it’s a ute, utilise it!”

We see a sign for Mangakuri Beach, and it’s only a couple of kilometres.

“Let’s do it.”

There’s not much here. Just a few houses and a large area of grasses that appear to have been invaded by rogue agapanthus, along the foreshore. Quite pretty.

Back on Mangakuri Road, it’s a journey through real sheep country, hilly but not too winding. The condition of the unsealed road is not bad really, and there are some sealed bits.

All along the roadsides we see these thistles with their teasel flower heads, which I’ve never seen growing so prolifically anywhere else…

And then scenes like this old shearing shed come into view…

And this…

Pourerere

We reach the junction and turn left to Pourerere Beach.

As this board that greets you as you arrive explains, the area has a long history of sheep farming…

I guess you can add beef farming to that…

Pourerere has a gorgeous beach…

v

Camping is allowed here (#3893) for a maximum stay of 3 nights. Permission must be obtained from the Central Hawkes Bay District Council all year round, and during the months December – February a ballot process for the sites operates, and charges apply. There is no internet or cell coverage here, so you would have to arrange it prior to arriving.

This is what we see as we drive along the beach road…

The beach side of the road is packed with tents, caravans and the occasional motorhome.

Down the end of the road there’s a warning about no turning space for large vehicles and it looks kind of private so we don’t venture further, but can see from a high point there are more holiday homes there…

Driving back along the beach road we spy this historic wool press, used from 1878 to about 1930, to prepare the wool bales for loading onto surf boats, which then took them out to small coastal ketches in the bay, for transporting to Napier.

We discover a bit more history before leaving Pourerere. A path through these lovely trees takes you to the site of an old church…

There are only a few gravestones there on the knoll now, including those of the parents of the Nairn brothers who were responsible for building the church for a congregation of about sixty.

The vicar used to ride up on horseback from Porangahau to conduct services.

The little church was taken down in 1928 as it was on a lean, and infested with bees.

Aramoana

The short drive to Aramoana is also on an unsealed road.

We stop to read a board about this foreshore area that was gifted to the Crown in 1970 by the owners of Ouepoto Station. Douglas and Mary McHardy wished to ensure public access onto the beach and foreshore for all time and so gifted it to the nation…

New Zealand Dotterel / TÅ«turiwhatu and Variable Oystercatchers / Torea breed here.

A little further along this beautiful home comes into view…

… we’re thinking this must be Ouepoto Station’s homestead. What a grand old house!

As we arrive in Aramoana we are surprised to find what looks to be recent development in the form of modern homes. Whether these are holiday homes or permanent residences I don’t know. The roads are marked Private so we couldn’t get too close.

This area is Te Angiangi Marine Reserve, which extends down to Blackhead, covering an area of 446 hectares and extending one nautical mile (1.853 kms) offshore.

Aramoana Beach…

A prominent headland overlooks the small community. All part of the Ouepoto sheep station…

Freedom camping is permitted in the car park (#3896). Three spaces are allocated and campers must register with Central Hawkes Bay District Council.

The car park in Aramoana…

Returning the same way to rejoin the Pourerere Road we came across a little traffic jam, country-style…

Can you see the sheep on the ground surrounded by the dogs?

She had fallen down, and “nek minit,” the farmer had whipped her up into the trailer…

Their gate was just up ahead, and they were off to new pastures…

It’s very scenic if you don’t mind the dirt roads…

And there is the odd curious beast …

We head back to Kairakau Beach taking the longer route and going to Waipawa township first.

We just made it before the last cafe closed for the day. We hadn’t eaten since breakfast.

And then, on the way back to Kairakau, here’s the Tuki Tuki River again…

The Patangata bridge crosses the Tuki Tuki River by the pub…

We didn’t stop here but I’ve read it’s a popular place for meals and park-overs (#3925).

Back at our caravan all is well. It’s been a fantastic day at Kairakau Beach, and the place is starting to fill up for the long weekend ahead.

We’ll be leaving tomorrow for the next part of our Central Hawkes Bay adventure.

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s